Friday, July 21, 2017

Cheating Casino Dealer on the run in Louisiana

Scene of Casino-Cheat Crime
LaCharle LeWayne Scott, a dealer at the Eldorado casino in Shreveport, Louisiana, was peeking at the top card of her deck (I am not sure which game it was but due to the amount I assume it was blackjack), and either giving or not giving that card to her two casino-cheating cohorts, identified as brothers Hilton and Deaudra Hart. I am not sure of the sex of the dealer, but he or she has been charged of repeating this offense at least 25 times for a total cheating profit to the Hart Brothers of $23,000.

So this was quite a sizeable casino scam for a Shreveport, Louisiana casino.

Peeking at the top card by a dealers reeks of a poker scam or blackjack scam, where the dealer evaluates whether or not that top card will help or hurt her partners.

Warrants were issued for all three participants, and the Hart Brothers duly turned themselves in, with bail being set for $5,000 each.

The dealer, however, is on the run...and I'm betting she'll be caught soon...most likely in another casino gambling with her illicit casino gains.

This is another example of the huge increase in dealer-participation casino-cheat scams that have gripped US casinos the past few years.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Phil Ivey Baccarat Edge-Sorting Scam Update! Supreme Court Lawyer Calls Ivey "Robinhood."

Is that Phil Ivey?
Phil Ivey's attorneys two days ago were in the United Kingdom's supreme court to make their last effort arguing that London's Crockfords Casino must pay Ivey and his casino-cheating companion Cheung Yin Sun the 7.7 million pounds the pair won back in 2012 by edge-sorting the baccarat cards.

Apparently the arguments were both interesting and entertaining. At one point, Crockfords' attorneys likened Ivey's testimony to the Robin Hood tale, claiming that Ivey's claim that he was just taking advantage of a flaw in the casino's dealing procedure was no better than Robin Hood's reason to steal from the rich to feed the poor.

I found a good article on the proceedings here that is worth a read.

Electronic Roulette Cheating in Quebec Casino Charlevoix

Pretty Place!
Yujin Wu, an Australian national of Asian descent, arrived at the Charlevoix casino, near Quebec City, on or around June 9th of this year. He played electronic roulette and very coolly and quickly beat the game for some five grand.

Mr. Wu cashed out his winnings, seemingly without incident, then returned to the casino on or around June 22nd.

This time Mr. Wu barely got to place a bet!

Whatever plans and strategies he had to beat the casino's electronic roulette table again were quickly dashed in the form of casino security agents and police arresting him.

Apparently, Mr. Wu arrived at the casino furnished with his own electronic gear to interfere with and beat the casino's electronic roulette system. Details are sketchy at best, but evidently an internal casino investigation into Mr. Wu's initial $5,000 win produced evidence of his tampering with the game and the casino was put on high alert for his return.

Sure enough Mr Wu did return as he must have figured he had a good thing going.

Well, now he is in an electronic mess! Probably a felony one.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Did Phil Ivey and Sun Overplay their Baccarat hand during Cheat Scandal?

Could they have been more careful?
We all know the story of how poker great Phil Ivey and his feline gambling partner Cheng Yin Sun edge-sorted their way to tens of millions of dollars that are currently tied up in legal hassles across the globe between Ivey and Sun and victimized casinos.

There has long been a debate between casino-cheat whizzes and experts as to whether or not Ivey and Sun's edge-sorting technique is actually casino cheating. I, as one of those whizzes and experts, believe that edge-sorting does constitute cheating, not because Ivey and Sun manipulated the cards but rather because they manipulated the deal of the game by getting dealers to deal and turn cards that breach casino dealing and game protection rules.

But that aside, could Ivey and Sun behaved differently and avoided detection of their scam? Could they have carried it out in a better fashion?

Probably so.

You've all heard the famous saying of doom about going to the well too many times, but in Ivey and Sun's case, perhaps they went to the wells with too-big buckets. By that I mean maybe they should have been content to win a million or a half million a shot instead of going as far as ten million in a single baccarat session. Maybe the casinos would have been more convinced that theirs was legitimate baccarat play by high rollers and not so suspicious.

Well I, for one, certainly know how hard it can be to put the reigns on something so good that seems invincible and undetectable. Back when I created my famous Savannah move, my teammates and I often debated about how hard we should hit the casinos with it. We knew we would eventually take heat even though the move was virtually flawless and undetectable.

That's because sheer winning alone eventually takes heat.

So we went for the gusto just like Ivey and Sun did.

In the end, I would have to say that Ivey and Sun probably should have gone after the casinos with a little less ferocity, but I would also have to say that it would have been nearly impossible for them to make that determination. They would probably have been thinking that even if their scam got discovered, as it did, they would never end up in court, where as it now stands they have to refund their winnings.

After all, they especially could never have imagined that the courts would rule that their scam was NOT cheating but that they still had to return their winnings to the casinos.

All in all, this baccarat edge-sorting case is without a doubt is the most interesting casino-cheating case (or pseudo casino-cheating case) in the history of casinos.

Friday, July 07, 2017

Are Putin's Hackers into Cheating Casinos?

Putin Casino Hacking Center?
Interesting question, isn't it?

We've all heard the accusations against Russian President Vladimir Putin ordering his team of ace hackers to infiltrate the 2016 US presidential election, but as Putin is known to be hoarding billions of dollars in money he's taken in one way or another from Russian businesses and businessmen, is it far-fetched to believe that he's also ordered his hackers to infiltrate gambling casinos?

Nor just US casinos but casinos anywhere in the world.

I don't have a definitive answer for this intriguing question, but I certainly do have an opinion. And it's based on facts that link Russian hackers to casino scams in the past.

Most recently, a team of Russian hackers beat Australian casinos' pokies out of millions. They did this by using smart phones, sophisticated apps and even more sophisticated mathematical minds behind the whole thing.

This same hackers beat American casinos' poker machines out of millions back in 2014. It was noted that American poker machines were paying a lot more money to Russian players than they were taking in--even though there were no large payouts or jackpots.

It was also noted that these Russian players would always have one of their hands in a pocket or in a bag while playing small amounts of money and then seemingly winning every time they made a significantly larger bet.

In Australia they were known to be entering the pokie screen displays into their sophisticated apps.

So, was Putin giving the orders for these illicit poker-machine scams as well?

Well, your guess is as good as mine, but I will tell you this: NEVER put anything beyond Vladimir Putin.

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

New Bahamian Casino hit by major Roulette Chip-Color Scam

How much is each stack worth?
I am a bit late in reporting this as it happened two months ago in the end of April, but it is a significant piece of news in the casino-cheating world.

Two American casino cheats from Florida hit the new Baha Mar casino with the already infamous roulette chip-color scam, a scam scene quite often in the continental US but not seen before in the Caribbean as far as I know. That's to say I've read no reports about it until now.

The scam is simply to obtain a color of non-redeemable roulette chips at one roulette table and then bring them to a second roulette chip where those chips are put into play where the same color chips at the second table have a higher established value than they did at the first. It is always done with at least two cheats partnering up and in some cases a whole team.

At the Baha Mar in Nassau, one unnamed roulette chips bought in and played at the first table and then handed them off a stack of those chips to a second unnamed roulette cheat who played them at a much higher denomination than for what the first cheat had paid for. Details are sketchy, but according to Bahamian police the pair made off with $6,000 in profits due to the difference in chip denominations.

Their scam came apart when a casino employee noticed the first cheat subtly pocketing roulette chips on several occasions and then heading off to the bathroom, where he must have given them to his cohort.

The $6,000 scam proved to be quite expensive for the pair of Floridian casino cheats. A Bahamian chief magistrate listened to the two tell her that they were pressured from a third man to participate in the scam before she sentenced them to two years in prison each.

My take: Definitely a heavy sentence for a low-level/low tech casino scam. I guess sometimes even the Bahamians are not so mellow!

Monday, July 03, 2017

Is it possible to get on a real enduring Hot Streak playing Slot Machines? Without Cheating?

Sizzling-Hot Slot Machines
When gamblers talk about hot streaks in casinos, online or in brick and mortar ones, the games that often get referred to are baccarat, roulette, blackjack and  poker. I myself as a baccarat dealer recall an evening where a gentleman banker dealt 24 winning bank hands in a row. I also remember one player playing heads up blackjack on a double-deck game who ran through two double decks without losing a single hand.

But what about slot machines?

When people talk about big scores on slot machines the subject is always jackpots or rigging jackpots, which in most casino jurisdictions is a felony punishable by years in prison. You don't hear much about people saying something like, "I went on this big sizzling slot machine streak and didn't lose on a single machine in a week."

Well, maybe that's because such a statement would be impossible based on reality.

But maybe not.

Back in the day when I was cheating casinos, my team and other cheating teams hung out after hours in a Denny's restaurant in Las Vegas next to the old Dunes Hotel. There we would shoot the shit and tell war stories. One guy at another table was telling a story about an old World War One veteran who entered the Golden Nugget casino in Downtown Vegas with a single nickel.

Well, did you ever hear of the expression "His last wooden nickel?"

This old-timer's nickel was not wooden....supposedly it was steel, one of the steel nickels that were minted during World War Two because of shortages of nickel alloy at the US mint.

And that steel nickel turned into gold because the guy went on a Sizzling Hot streak hitting slot machine after slot machine for small jackpots, which led to a much bigger jackpot he hit with five silver dollars at a casino ironically called "The Mint.".

The amount of his sizzling win was more than half a million dollars...and we´re talking 1960s here!

Saturday, July 01, 2017

Interesting Online Casino Cheat Article

I came across this article and find it well written and very informative. Is is about Edgeless.io, a compnay that promises absolute transparency and zero house percentage. I don't have an opinion about Edgeless.io, but the article deals quite well with online casino cheating.

Don't Take the 888 Casino Blog and its Star Writer Nicholas Colon too Seriously

888's Star Casino-Cheat Writer
A while back I wrote six articles for the 888 Casino blog. They only published two of them, which kind of pissed me off, even though I was paid for all six. I wondered what the problem was. I mean I have been writing casino articles about cheating and advantage play for more than a decade now, for blogs, magazines and even newspapers, and none of the publishers of my work ever seemed to have a problem with it.

But the editors at the 888 Casino Blog would never give me a straight answer as to why the majority of my articles were never published on its site. So I just let it go, cancelled my agreement with them but still continued to read the articles posted on it.

And slowly I began to see perhaps why they never published my articles. I don't want to sound haughty, but maybe my articles were too good and too real for them.

It seems to me that the bulk of their articles are exaggerated and inaccurate. Their constant coverage of ineffective roulette strategies, baccarat strategies, side-bet strategies to me is annoying.

Then their articles on cheat methods such as dice-control might make readers want to quit their day jobs and become potential Casino Cheats Hall of Fame inductees while in reality their cheating articles are ridiculous.

Take a recent one by Nicholas Colon, one of 888's star writers who has begun posting a barrage of casino advantage-play and cheating articles over the past several months.

The article of his that really got me going to write this critique is his latest casino-cheat article in which he calls Dustin Marks, a well-known cheat but who in reality did minimum damage to Las Vegas and other jurisdiction casinos, perhaps the greatest cheat of all time.

In his article, Colon states that Marks earned tens of millions of dollars during the four-year period of his blackjack career and as much as $150,000 in single sessions by way of marking cards, stacking cards, stacking chips...and even switching in coolers.

GIMME A BREAK!

If Dustin Marks earned $150,000 total for his entire four years cheating, I'd be surprised! Look, I admit that written accounts of how many millions I earned during my 25-year cheat career are greatly exaggerated, but I promise you this: I sure as hell got a lot closer to tens of millions than Dustin Marks did!

Reading Colon's article on Dustin Marx as well as his other articles on 888's blog lead me to the conclusion that he is just another writer on the subject of casino cheating and advantage-play who doesn't know much about either.

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Former High-Level Casino Executive Goes Down in Big Pennsylvania Slot Machine/Loyalty Card Scam

Casino Exec/Casino Cheat
Pennsylvania casinos have been a hotbed for casino-cheating scams, and a significant amount of those have involved employees, dealers and floorpeople alike. But we don't see to many high-level casino execs involved in cheating scams.

Robert Pellegrini made the grade. As vice-president of the Mohegan Sun casino in Wilkes-Barre, he engineered and directed a $500,000 scam that involved bilking the casino by using players' stolen loyalty card PIN numbers in order to play the slot machines for free.

Pellegrini teamed up with Rochelle Poszeluznyj, a casino cocktail waitress who memorized players loyalty card PIN numbers as she took their orders and brought the drinks. She then passed that information to Pellegrini, who made copies of the cards and stocked them up with free reward money which was used to get free slot play.

Enter Heltzel, a casino player who'd already been caught cheating at that very but inexplicably was not banned. Pellegrini made Heltzel the player who actually played with the loyalty cards, fraught with stolen identities, and split the money with Pellegrini and Poszeluznyj.

They bilked the casino for nearly a half a million bucks.

How did the scam come apart?

Well, you might have guessed it. Of course it had something to do with Poszeluznyj, who may have been a real looker who liked to go shopping with her share of the proceeds.

Problem was a jealous male dealer who was not involved in the scam but who knew about it from Poszeluznyj, was in love with the cocktail waitress and thought that Joseph Heltzel was bird-dogging Poseluznyj.

Pellegrini got 32 months in prison. At sentencing he claimed he was a compulsive gambler who stole the money not out of greed but rather to support his gambling habit.

Little credibility there, however, as at the time he was arrested he had more than $400,000 in the bank and other assets. He made the statement to the judge, "Where do you think casino workers go on their days off? They go to other casinos."

Apparently the judge bought it.

I don't. I was a casino dealer for two years and most of the dealers I knew stayed as far away from casinos as they could on their days off. Pellegrini was quoted as saying to his cohorts, "Get busy! I have bills to pay."

Poszeluznyj and Heltzel have pleaded guilty in the cheat scam and are awaiting sentencing.

My take: The most unusual piece of this unusual casino-cheat scam has got to be Poszeluznyj's last name! I mean, have you ever seen a last name containing two z's and ending in nyj? Not in this country!

And to torture myself I wrote it out each time in this article! I did not use any quick keys, and of course I could not remember how to spell it even one time!